Chronicles of a Word-Traveler

Hi! This is a blog about books. I don't exactly call myself a "book worm" because honestly, my imagination doesn't stretch far and wide. I'm no book expert too. I just love exploring new worlds through the pages :)

So these are the books I've read and how I've journeyed through them. Enjoy!
The title itself is already a statement. 
As I leaf through the book and get to know Hattie, I feel a little bit like her. That quote about the visiting alien got me, I guess. Hattie seems mature even for her age and I admire her for that. Adam’s character is as lovable as he is unpredictable. Despite his condition, the reader could tell he’s wise and he knows more than he lets on. His serious conversations with Hattie were heart-warming. Honestly, I am not so familiar with the whole setting — the time bracket in which the plot had unfolded. Still, I could understand how Hattie’s grandma seems like a scary warden who’ll whip you once you wander even 1 cm from your line. Stuff like that. 
I never fully expected the twist in the ending, though, which resulted to a post-book depression and slight resentment of having been entered the world within this novel’s pages. However, this book taught me that different doesn’t always make you special. Sometimes it isolates you from the rest of the world and from people who desire to get close to you. 
I end this with a quote by Hattie herself:  

‎”I thank Adam, as I have thanked him almost every night since August, for showing me that it’s possible to lift the corners of our universe. Adam told me about lifting the corners the second time I met him, but I had no idea what he meant. Now I think I do. It’s all about changing what’s handed to you, about poking around a little, lifting the corners, seeing what’s underneath, poking that. Sometimes things work out, sometimes they don’t, but at least you’re exploring. And life is always more interesting that way.”

The title itself is already a statement. 

As I leaf through the book and get to know Hattie, I feel a little bit like her. That quote about the visiting alien got me, I guess. Hattie seems mature even for her age and I admire her for that. Adam’s character is as lovable as he is unpredictable. Despite his condition, the reader could tell he’s wise and he knows more than he lets on. His serious conversations with Hattie were heart-warming. Honestly, I am not so familiar with the whole setting — the time bracket in which the plot had unfolded. Still, I could understand how Hattie’s grandma seems like a scary warden who’ll whip you once you wander even 1 cm from your line. Stuff like that. 

I never fully expected the twist in the ending, though, which resulted to a post-book depression and slight resentment of having been entered the world within this novel’s pages. However, this book taught me that different doesn’t always make you special. Sometimes it isolates you from the rest of the world and from people who desire to get close to you. 

I end this with a quote by Hattie herself:  

‎”I thank Adam, as I have thanked him almost every night since August, for showing me that it’s possible to lift the corners of our universe. Adam told me about lifting the corners the second time I met him, but I had no idea what he meant. Now I think I do. It’s all about changing what’s handed to you, about poking around a little, lifting the corners, seeing what’s underneath, poking that. Sometimes things work out, sometimes they don’t, but at least you’re exploring. And life is always more interesting that way.”


The Mysterious Benedict Society - Trenton Lee Stewart 

Is this too much of a children’s book? I think not. 
So my friend sort of talked about this book and I got curious. A couple months later, I saw it on the shelves in FullyBooked and having no background whatsoever  about it I bought the third book, The Prisoner’s Dilemma. Naturally I had my ways of reading the first book and right now I’m almost finished with the whole Trilogy except I haven’t read the 2nd installment yet. But my style is that I usually write these book review of sorts shortly after I’ve read the books. Here goes. 
Reynie is such a believable hero/protagonist. He’s the kind of person most people identify themselves with—average looking, average complexion… well, you get the key word: average. Despite that, he has wowed me with his insightful analysis and keen observation to every little detail that he always manages to solve any puzzle presented to him. It makes me think that, “Hey I’m average too. But it doesn’t mean I’ll do average things only. Reynie did it, why can’t I?” Of course he’s a fictional character and I’m not… but that’s out of the question :)) Moving on to Kate Wetherall. All I can say; what she’s made of, is guts. I also like the fact that it’s a girl who’s like the physical backbone of the group. It’s very empowering. Sticky Washington…well his development throughout the series is remarkable. Still, not much has changed. Photographic memory is such a great blessing. His story about his parents was heart-breaking but I’m glad for the redemption at the end part. Constance.. she’s just a pain in the butt! For all of them. As for her being two years old; I was already spoiled then so it didn’t came much as a surprise. Though, she symbolizes the idea that even someone’s presence is unnecessary for you, in the end, they clearly have a purpose for being in your life. Just hang on a little bit and you’ll see :) 
Ok, on with the story! First of all, I’m sure I would never pass all those tests that Mr. Benedict gave them. That chess thing—the white knight?—I never would have looked it that way. And it’s also amazing how each of them had different ways of solving the tests. It proves how varied their skills are, but they’re skillful nonetheless in their unique ways. The “Nomansan Island” bit had me laughing. Obviously it was a play of words. No man is an island. So yeah. If there was a school like the Institute, I would’ve liked to go there. It’s been described as having a beautiful scenery and there’s nothing quite better than being educated in a pleasant environment. All the rest of the plot are a bunch of mind-teasers and riddles, and the Morse codes were really cryptic that they keep you guessing. As if you’re with the rest of the kids and you can’t help but try to crack the mind-boggling riddles. My favorite was when Reynie thought The Whisperer was too strong and he sought for advise. Then Mr. Benedict told him “Remember the white knight.” And I was like, “AWWW!”
Their mission was really dangerous and when I imagine myself in their position—living behind enemy lines, surrounded by the ones they’re tasked to bring down, with their only protection a shore away—I get chills. What they did were really brave. This book showed me what it really is to be a team. To not let anyone be left behind. This book showed me friendship overcoming the greatest test. I learned that when it comes to friends, sticking together is the key. Even if sometimes it’s hard, stick together and you’ll come around victorious. 
On another note, I read on Wikipedia that Kate has a crush on Reynie. But so far, I haven’t noticed something like that. I don’t know, maybe it shows in the second book. Maybe. Hahaha but I just wanted to see how adorable both would be! Or how Milligan and Miss Perumal would think about it. Nah. 
If you like codes, mystery, evil twins, unlikely friendships, and hair dryers that can cause the demise of the whole world, then this series is for you. And I think those who have read A Series of Unfortunate Events will be fans of the series as well. Those with vivid imaginations susceptible to great details will enjoy this.
For those who don’t (like me) then…..TOO BAD!
Kidding.
You’ll enjoy this equally :) Enjoy reading! 

The Mysterious Benedict Society - Trenton Lee Stewart 

Is this too much of a children’s book? I think not. 

So my friend sort of talked about this book and I got curious. A couple months later, I saw it on the shelves in FullyBooked and having no background whatsoever  about it I bought the third book, The Prisoner’s Dilemma. Naturally I had my ways of reading the first book and right now I’m almost finished with the whole Trilogy except I haven’t read the 2nd installment yet. But my style is that I usually write these book review of sorts shortly after I’ve read the books. Here goes. 

Reynie is such a believable hero/protagonist. He’s the kind of person most people identify themselves with—average looking, average complexion… well, you get the key word: average. Despite that, he has wowed me with his insightful analysis and keen observation to every little detail that he always manages to solve any puzzle presented to him. It makes me think that, “Hey I’m average too. But it doesn’t mean I’ll do average things only. Reynie did it, why can’t I?” Of course he’s a fictional character and I’m not… but that’s out of the question :)) Moving on to Kate Wetherall. All I can say; what she’s made of, is guts. I also like the fact that it’s a girl who’s like the physical backbone of the group. It’s very empowering. Sticky Washington…well his development throughout the series is remarkable. Still, not much has changed. Photographic memory is such a great blessing. His story about his parents was heart-breaking but I’m glad for the redemption at the end part. Constance.. she’s just a pain in the butt! For all of them. As for her being two years old; I was already spoiled then so it didn’t came much as a surprise. Though, she symbolizes the idea that even someone’s presence is unnecessary for you, in the end, they clearly have a purpose for being in your life. Just hang on a little bit and you’ll see :) 

Ok, on with the story! First of all, I’m sure I would never pass all those tests that Mr. Benedict gave them. That chess thing—the white knight?—I never would have looked it that way. And it’s also amazing how each of them had different ways of solving the tests. It proves how varied their skills are, but they’re skillful nonetheless in their unique ways. The “Nomansan Island” bit had me laughing. Obviously it was a play of words. No man is an island. So yeah. If there was a school like the Institute, I would’ve liked to go there. It’s been described as having a beautiful scenery and there’s nothing quite better than being educated in a pleasant environment. All the rest of the plot are a bunch of mind-teasers and riddles, and the Morse codes were really cryptic that they keep you guessing. As if you’re with the rest of the kids and you can’t help but try to crack the mind-boggling riddles. My favorite was when Reynie thought The Whisperer was too strong and he sought for advise. Then Mr. Benedict told him “Remember the white knight.” And I was like, “AWWW!”

Their mission was really dangerous and when I imagine myself in their position—living behind enemy lines, surrounded by the ones they’re tasked to bring down, with their only protection a shore away—I get chills. What they did were really brave. This book showed me what it really is to be a team. To not let anyone be left behind. This book showed me friendship overcoming the greatest test. I learned that when it comes to friends, sticking together is the key. Even if sometimes it’s hard, stick together and you’ll come around victorious. 

On another note, I read on Wikipedia that Kate has a crush on Reynie. But so far, I haven’t noticed something like that. I don’t know, maybe it shows in the second book. Maybe. Hahaha but I just wanted to see how adorable both would be! Or how Milligan and Miss Perumal would think about it. Nah. 

If you like codes, mystery, evil twins, unlikely friendships, and hair dryers that can cause the demise of the whole world, then this series is for you. And I think those who have read A Series of Unfortunate Events will be fans of the series as well. Those with vivid imaginations susceptible to great details will enjoy this.

For those who don’t (like me) then…..TOO BAD!

Kidding.

You’ll enjoy this equally :) Enjoy reading! 


Looking For Alaska by John Green

BEFORE: I thought, “This isn’t a book for me.” It was too chaotic and dark and sad… it was too realistic.See, people have different reasons to read books—mine was escapism. Yes, I read to fly myself to other worlds because I’ve done nothing in this big ‘ol world. I was seeking a Great Perhaps, and I found it in books. I never really intended to read this novel because I for one know that tragic stories will only put me into a state of depression. 
AFTER:I read the last word in it (which were the last words of some president of America), and felt like someone punched a hole in my heart. When I closed it after reading, I felt like I’ve also lost a friend. As if you were also in Miles’ shoes, and that me too, couldn’t get over the mystery that is Alaska. 
—-
Miles is an interesting main character. His knack for famous last words was random and refreshing. If ever I met someone like him, I’d probably think he was too much of a geek and get out of his way. But reading this book felt like knowing Miles. And I liked what I saw beyond the covers of the book. 
His first meeting with Chip or The Colonel was awkward and just right. Then he met Alaska. The good thing about this novel was that he didn’t fall for her right then and there like all those cheesy novels would go. Of course he thought she was hot but he it wasn’t love at first sight. In Culver Creek, everything was exciting. The excitement there is of a totally different kind than the “exciting” things in my high-school. They smoked. They drank wine. And you know? I liked the danger and the friendship between Pudge, The Colonel & Alaska. 
I didn’t understand why Lara had to come to the picture. I was half-expecting Alaska would get jealous of her and confront Pudge about it. But she was always saying, “I love my boyfriend.” I love Dr. Hyde’s teachings. If ever I took World Religions as a class in college, I wish I had a professor like him. 
My hands were shaking as I read the first chapter after the page with “After” written on it. It was all really depressing. Really. Like I said in the beginning, I felt like someone close to me died too. She was a ball of energy and it used to drain them all, but now it was the other way around—she drained all her energy and Pudge, Colonel, Takumi and Lara had become empty batteries. 
I do not recommend this to people with weak hearts. Because trust me, you have to be strong to be able to get through this book. Looking For Alaska is a labyrinth of suffering. Getting over it won’t be just “Straight & Fast”. 

Looking For Alaska by John Green

BEFORE: I thought, “This isn’t a book for me.” It was too chaotic and dark and sad… it was too realistic.See, people have different reasons to read books—mine was escapism. Yes, I read to fly myself to other worlds because I’ve done nothing in this big ‘ol world. I was seeking a Great Perhaps, and I found it in books. I never really intended to read this novel because I for one know that tragic stories will only put me into a state of depression. 

AFTER:I read the last word in it (which were the last words of some president of America), and felt like someone punched a hole in my heart. When I closed it after reading, I felt like I’ve also lost a friend. As if you were also in Miles’ shoes, and that me too, couldn’t get over the mystery that is Alaska. 

—-

Miles is an interesting main character. His knack for famous last words was random and refreshing. If ever I met someone like him, I’d probably think he was too much of a geek and get out of his way. But reading this book felt like knowing Miles. And I liked what I saw beyond the covers of the book. 

His first meeting with Chip or The Colonel was awkward and just right. Then he met Alaska. The good thing about this novel was that he didn’t fall for her right then and there like all those cheesy novels would go. Of course he thought she was hot but he it wasn’t love at first sight. In Culver Creek, everything was exciting. The excitement there is of a totally different kind than the “exciting” things in my high-school. They smoked. They drank wine. And you know? I liked the danger and the friendship between Pudge, The Colonel & Alaska. 

I didn’t understand why Lara had to come to the picture. I was half-expecting Alaska would get jealous of her and confront Pudge about it. But she was always saying, “I love my boyfriend.” I love Dr. Hyde’s teachings. If ever I took World Religions as a class in college, I wish I had a professor like him. 

My hands were shaking as I read the first chapter after the page with “After” written on it. It was all really depressing. Really. Like I said in the beginning, I felt like someone close to me died too. She was a ball of energy and it used to drain them all, but now it was the other way around—she drained all her energy and Pudge, Colonel, Takumi and Lara had become empty batteries. 

I do not recommend this to people with weak hearts. Because trust me, you have to be strong to be able to get through this book. Looking For Alaska is a labyrinth of suffering. Getting over it won’t be just “Straight & Fast”. 


20 Times A Lady by Karyn Bosnak

I randomly saw this book in National Bookstore. It had this same cover and it kind of interested me. I don’t really know why. So I read it about two days ago.
It’s about Delilah Darling finding all the men she slept with and trying to strike up a romance with one of them. She’s doing this because she saw a survey in some magazine that the average number a person’s sexual partners is 10.5. She had slept with 20 men at the age of thirty. With a little help from her flirtatious sexy Irish neighbor, Colin, she embarks on a journey across America to “coincidentally stumble” upon her old flames… and boy, did the fire go out of control. :))) It all went horribly wrong when she started to realize that all the people she’s trying to find are either gay, married, A PRIEST!, or too weird that she didn’t wonder why he was still single. In the end, she found out that she had been running around the country out of an impulse when all she would’ve done was knock on the door of the room across from hers. 
Delilah Darling is absolutely nuts. I kind of see myself in her, that’s why while reading the book, I kept thinking, “What if I ended up like her?” I mean, not that I’d sleep with more than a dozen of men by the time I reach 30. But you know… I fear that I’d still be single at that time. Because like her, I’m too worried about what the world tells me to be average, above average, or below average. We have similar issues - I feel like my little sister would grow up to be like Daisy. She’d be the prettier daughter, the one who’d marry first, who won’t have a spectacular job but still very lucky because my Mom spoils her to that extent. My mom is also crazy. But I hope she won’t end up like Delilah’s mom. :)) I seriously can’t handle that. 
The story flow was flawless. It was a mix of reality and a bit of cliche RomCom moment at the end, what with all the boombox and stuff. Still, I found it sweet. :) I really couldn’t stop reading… curious to what happened to those people she knew before. Maybe I wondered about that too. What would my friends become in 10 years time? Will the losers still be losers or will they be better than before? (I think about the future way too much.)
This book isn’t for teens.. I think it’s for middle-aged adults. Which is why I’m wondering why I even liked it. :)) There’s a movie based on it, though. The title is “What’s Your Number” starring Chris Evans! Yeah, he’s hot. But he’s not the Colin for me. The movie isn’t really an exact replication of the novel. Like I said, the plot is just based on 20 Times A Lady. I want to watch it… but you can’t always get what you want, you know? So yeah.
I can recommend this to those people who can stomach to read some words that are supposed to be censored. Like really, if you’re a conservative, you better open up your mind a bit. Or you’ll miss this opportunity to learn about how love will find you, not the other way around. :) 

20 Times A Lady by Karyn Bosnak

I randomly saw this book in National Bookstore. It had this same cover and it kind of interested me. I don’t really know why. So I read it about two days ago.

It’s about Delilah Darling finding all the men she slept with and trying to strike up a romance with one of them. She’s doing this because she saw a survey in some magazine that the average number a person’s sexual partners is 10.5. She had slept with 20 men at the age of thirty. With a little help from her flirtatious sexy Irish neighbor, Colin, she embarks on a journey across America to “coincidentally stumble” upon her old flames… and boy, did the fire go out of control. :))) It all went horribly wrong when she started to realize that all the people she’s trying to find are either gay, married, A PRIEST!, or too weird that she didn’t wonder why he was still single. In the end, she found out that she had been running around the country out of an impulse when all she would’ve done was knock on the door of the room across from hers. 

Delilah Darling is absolutely nuts. I kind of see myself in her, that’s why while reading the book, I kept thinking, “What if I ended up like her?” I mean, not that I’d sleep with more than a dozen of men by the time I reach 30. But you know… I fear that I’d still be single at that time. Because like her, I’m too worried about what the world tells me to be average, above average, or below average. We have similar issues - I feel like my little sister would grow up to be like Daisy. She’d be the prettier daughter, the one who’d marry first, who won’t have a spectacular job but still very lucky because my Mom spoils her to that extent. My mom is also crazy. But I hope she won’t end up like Delilah’s mom. :)) I seriously can’t handle that. 

The story flow was flawless. It was a mix of reality and a bit of cliche RomCom moment at the end, what with all the boombox and stuff. Still, I found it sweet. :) I really couldn’t stop reading… curious to what happened to those people she knew before. Maybe I wondered about that too. What would my friends become in 10 years time? Will the losers still be losers or will they be better than before? (I think about the future way too much.)

This book isn’t for teens.. I think it’s for middle-aged adults. Which is why I’m wondering why I even liked it. :)) There’s a movie based on it, though. The title is “What’s Your Number” starring Chris Evans! Yeah, he’s hot. But he’s not the Colin for me. The movie isn’t really an exact replication of the novel. Like I said, the plot is just based on 20 Times A Lady. I want to watch it… but you can’t always get what you want, you know? So yeah.

I can recommend this to those people who can stomach to read some words that are supposed to be censored. Like really, if you’re a conservative, you better open up your mind a bit. Or you’ll miss this opportunity to learn about how love will find you, not the other way around. :) 

I Am Number Four & The Power of Six  by Pittacus Lore
Warning: This post contains spoilers. Read at your own risk. 
I bought my classmate’s copy of I Am Number Four. It’s the small-book version or whatever it’s called. I finished reading it in 2 day tops. And what do I think about it? Well.. when you’re used to reading 1st Person POV in Percy Jackson’s quirky and humorous way, you kind of look for that format in other books. This novel was a little monotonous  for me, but that’s just because of the reason above. However, I realized that I Am Number Four focuses more on the action and pace of the story. It should be carefully narrated in a way to keep the readers wanting more. I like the mystery of it. Questions such as  ”When will the Mogadorians find him and what he would do once he’s found? Will he fight back? Will be strong enough to do so? Will he leave Sarah? What’s in the Chest?” were constantly floating in my head. The part about Aphrodite, Apollo, and Hermes had Loric parents made the Percy Jackson-obsessed fan inside me tick. Idk. It was too contradictory. All in all, it was a nice read. Just nice. I’m not addicted to it (yet?). 
I only got half-way through the movie so I can’t join your “The books are better than the movie” debate just yet. But I imagine Sarah with Dianna Agron’s face which is kind of weird since John Smith in the book is actually 15 years old. I have this image of Dianna holding hands with a small kid, kissing him under the moonlight….*shudder* 
The Power of Six was a lot different from I Am Number Four. The first book was slow-paced, as John Smith slowly discovers his Legacies while dealing with Mark and bullies, being in love, finding friends—typical high-school drama. I kept anticipating when the Mogadorians would finally appear, to get some action other than John & Sarah’s mushy scenes. Sure, it seemed sweet at first, but I got tired of him always describing Sarah’s kisses as “lingering”. :)) 
I thought that was one of the central conflicts of the story—how John and Sarah would make it work out between them, considering the other is alien while the other was human. Loric people fall in love once, but it’s not the same way with humans. So it’s possible that Sarah would move on someday, when she gets tired of John causing trouble for her and being away all the time. Then came Six. I really like her character. She’s freaking bad-ass! I totally agree with Sam and John to have imagined her with a name like “Stryker” or “Storm”. Anyway, I think John is better off with Six than with Sarah.  I think his love for her is very unhealthy. It always makes John do stupid things. Sarah can end up with Mark, for all I care. Plus, she betrayed him and turned him in the police. 
I think Sam would be an awesome friend—he proved that much in the sequel.The bizarre love triangle of Sam-Six-John is adorable. I love it when John and Six are “flirting”.. they always get too violent and destroy stuff, which is funny. I do believe that even if Six said that she also liked Sam, she really liked John more. What with her kissing only Sam’s cheek, and a full-blown make-out session with John. 
Marina’s POV was interesting because it’s the exact opposite from John’s. Number Four always hated being on the run, changing names, leaving friends behind. While Seven was stuck in a convent with ironically evil nuns, filled with bullies and all. But here’s the similarity between the two—they both want to break free of the routine. Marina wanted to get out of that town, because she was sick and tired of being in the same place for years. On the other hand, John was tired of always fleeing everytime there’s a little sign of the Mogadores. I absolutely like Hector Ricardo! My favorite quotes from him: "If ever you meet a man who’s drowning his sorrows, kindly inform him that his sorrows know how to swim." and "The key to change is letting go of the fear." So yeah, I’m devastated that he died :( 
I was spoiled about Ella being Number Ten so I wasn’t too shocked with that.  Sam Goode’s father as Henri & John’s guide when they first came to Earth caught me offguard though. It’s really amazing that Sam and John are now bestfriends. Nine is very sexy, by the way, and his Legacies are majorly cool. I wish we knew more about him, how he was captured, where his Cepan was, what his Earth names were. Now I’ve seen Four, Six, Seven, Nine and Ten. I wonder where number Five and Eight are. Were they having fights too, somewhere in the world? 
So yeah. The books make me wonder what other things we’re oblivious to. Or how much we don’t know about the things happening around us. I’m not a nerd like Sam who believes most conspiracy theories, but I do believe that anything can be possible. We can’t rule out the possibility of aliens. It’s morbid to think that we’re alone in this vast universe. It’s more comforting to think that there’s some other civilization out there, also searching for life-sustaining planets. 

I Am Number Four & The Power of Six  by Pittacus Lore

Warning: This post contains spoilers. Read at your own risk. 

I bought my classmate’s copy of I Am Number Four. It’s the small-book version or whatever it’s called. I finished reading it in 2 day tops. And what do I think about it? Well.. when you’re used to reading 1st Person POV in Percy Jackson’s quirky and humorous way, you kind of look for that format in other books. This novel was a little monotonous  for me, but that’s just because of the reason above. However, I realized that I Am Number Four focuses more on the action and pace of the story. It should be carefully narrated in a way to keep the readers wanting more. I like the mystery of it. Questions such as  ”When will the Mogadorians find him and what he would do once he’s found? Will he fight back? Will be strong enough to do so? Will he leave Sarah? What’s in the Chest?” were constantly floating in my head. The part about Aphrodite, Apollo, and Hermes had Loric parents made the Percy Jackson-obsessed fan inside me tick. Idk. It was too contradictory. All in all, it was a nice read. Just nice. I’m not addicted to it (yet?). 

I only got half-way through the movie so I can’t join your “The books are better than the movie” debate just yet. But I imagine Sarah with Dianna Agron’s face which is kind of weird since John Smith in the book is actually 15 years old. I have this image of Dianna holding hands with a small kid, kissing him under the moonlight….*shudder* 

The Power of Six was a lot different from I Am Number Four. The first book was slow-paced, as John Smith slowly discovers his Legacies while dealing with Mark and bullies, being in love, finding friends—typical high-school drama. I kept anticipating when the Mogadorians would finally appear, to get some action other than John & Sarah’s mushy scenes. Sure, it seemed sweet at first, but I got tired of him always describing Sarah’s kisses as “lingering”. :)) 

I thought that was one of the central conflicts of the story—how John and Sarah would make it work out between them, considering the other is alien while the other was human. Loric people fall in love once, but it’s not the same way with humans. So it’s possible that Sarah would move on someday, when she gets tired of John causing trouble for her and being away all the time. Then came Six. I really like her character. She’s freaking bad-ass! I totally agree with Sam and John to have imagined her with a name like “Stryker” or “Storm”. Anyway, I think John is better off with Six than with Sarah.  I think his love for her is very unhealthy. It always makes John do stupid things. Sarah can end up with Mark, for all I care. Plus, she betrayed him and turned him in the police. 

I think Sam would be an awesome friend—he proved that much in the sequel.The bizarre love triangle of Sam-Six-John is adorable. I love it when John and Six are “flirting”.. they always get too violent and destroy stuff, which is funny. I do believe that even if Six said that she also liked Sam, she really liked John more. What with her kissing only Sam’s cheek, and a full-blown make-out session with John. 

Marina’s POV was interesting because it’s the exact opposite from John’s. Number Four always hated being on the run, changing names, leaving friends behind. While Seven was stuck in a convent with ironically evil nuns, filled with bullies and all. But here’s the similarity between the two—they both want to break free of the routine. Marina wanted to get out of that town, because she was sick and tired of being in the same place for years. On the other hand, John was tired of always fleeing everytime there’s a little sign of the Mogadores. I absolutely like Hector Ricardo! My favorite quotes from him: "If ever you meet a man who’s drowning his sorrows, kindly inform him that his sorrows know how to swim." and "The key to change is letting go of the fear." So yeah, I’m devastated that he died :( 

I was spoiled about Ella being Number Ten so I wasn’t too shocked with that.  Sam Goode’s father as Henri & John’s guide when they first came to Earth caught me offguard though. It’s really amazing that Sam and John are now bestfriends. Nine is very sexy, by the way, and his Legacies are majorly cool. I wish we knew more about him, how he was captured, where his Cepan was, what his Earth names were. Now I’ve seen Four, Six, Seven, Nine and Ten. I wonder where number Five and Eight are. Were they having fights too, somewhere in the world? 

So yeah. The books make me wonder what other things we’re oblivious to. Or how much we don’t know about the things happening around us. I’m not a nerd like Sam who believes most conspiracy theories, but I do believe that anything can be possible. We can’t rule out the possibility of aliens. It’s morbid to think that we’re alone in this vast universe. It’s more comforting to think that there’s some other civilization out there, also searching for life-sustaining planets. 


Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher 

I recently finished reading this novel. It was so… sad and heartbreaking and it makes me aware of some things you’re not aware of before. It’s about the suicide of Hannah Baker and how the tapes she sent to Clay Jensen inevitably changes the way he sees his classmates, the girl, and life. 
It taught me how to think well before doing something to someone, because who knows, it could ruin their whole life. It puts things in perspective—that no matter how little pain you’ve caused to someone, they could carry the scar forever. To quote Hannah Baker, “Everything affects everything.” You could sit beside someone who’s broken and damaged and you wouldn’t know it. So think before you act, because you never know what problems that person might have. The small things you didn’t think would matter in the future could be a big deal for someone else. Especially if we don’t consider their feelings and what they’re possibly going through. Also, there’s this part where this girl knocked off a Stop Sign and didn’t report it and it led to a man’s death. Realize that our own negligence and irresponsibility can cause harm to others. 
Hannah Baker’s story has changed my life in a way. So this is my way of changing yours, by asking you to read this book. :) 
  • Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher 

I recently finished reading this novel. It was so… sad and heartbreaking and it makes me aware of some things you’re not aware of before. It’s about the suicide of Hannah Baker and how the tapes she sent to Clay Jensen inevitably changes the way he sees his classmates, the girl, and life. 

It taught me how to think well before doing something to someone, because who knows, it could ruin their whole life. It puts things in perspective—that no matter how little pain you’ve caused to someone, they could carry the scar forever. To quote Hannah Baker, “Everything affects everything.” You could sit beside someone who’s broken and damaged and you wouldn’t know it. So think before you act, because you never know what problems that person might have. The small things you didn’t think would matter in the future could be a big deal for someone else. Especially if we don’t consider their feelings and what they’re possibly going through. Also, there’s this part where this girl knocked off a Stop Sign and didn’t report it and it led to a man’s death. Realize that our own negligence and irresponsibility can cause harm to others. 

Hannah Baker’s story has changed my life in a way. So this is my way of changing yours, by asking you to read this book. :) 


Beastly - Alex Flinn
A Kiss in Time - Alex Flinn

(The book covers look awesome side by side, btw) 
I love modern retelling of classic fairytales. I’ve never read other retellings of Beauty & the Beast and The Sleeping Beauty, all I knew about were the Disney versions of these stories. 
I don’t remember much anymore (I’ve read the book like a month ago) but I’m certain that Alex Flinn’s Beastly was worth the read. The characters had depth and I like the progress of the plot. I love how Adrian cares about his roses. I love the witch, the blind tutor, and the girl. Now I just realized that the frog prince in the chatroom might actually be the one in Cloaked, still by Alex Flinn. (I’m on it!)
So A Kiss in Time - I read it just recently so I remember more about it. The book made me think about what I really wanted to do with my life, since Talia had encouraged Jack to stand up to his father to pursue his dream of becoming a landscape designer. I adore their characters, they contrast each other so much. Jack also reminded me of someone and seeing that he could change for the better, I’m looking forward for the person to go into a process of maturing as well. Destiny also played a key role in the story. Do I believe in it now? Sometimes I do. 
It wasn’t also just a fairytale now, where the Prince just kisses the sleeping Princess and it’s happily-ever-after. There’s a realistic twist that makes it… believable (but of course minus the sleeping for 300 years and a whole town never decomposes - they could have been saints!). Still, it’s an enjoyable book. 
Yeah. I recommend these books for those who love fairy tales. Beastly may have haad a darker mood than A Kiss in Time but all the same, they’re awesome. 
  • Beastly - Alex Flinn
  • A Kiss in Time - Alex Flinn

(The book covers look awesome side by side, btw) 

I love modern retelling of classic fairytales. I’ve never read other retellings of Beauty & the Beast and The Sleeping Beauty, all I knew about were the Disney versions of these stories. 

I don’t remember much anymore (I’ve read the book like a month ago) but I’m certain that Alex Flinn’s Beastly was worth the read. The characters had depth and I like the progress of the plot. I love how Adrian cares about his roses. I love the witch, the blind tutor, and the girl. Now I just realized that the frog prince in the chatroom might actually be the one in Cloaked, still by Alex Flinn. (I’m on it!)

So A Kiss in Time - I read it just recently so I remember more about it. The book made me think about what I really wanted to do with my life, since Talia had encouraged Jack to stand up to his father to pursue his dream of becoming a landscape designer. I adore their characters, they contrast each other so much. Jack also reminded me of someone and seeing that he could change for the better, I’m looking forward for the person to go into a process of maturing as well. Destiny also played a key role in the story. Do I believe in it now? Sometimes I do. 

It wasn’t also just a fairytale now, where the Prince just kisses the sleeping Princess and it’s happily-ever-after. There’s a realistic twist that makes it… believable (but of course minus the sleeping for 300 years and a whole town never decomposes - they could have been saints!). Still, it’s an enjoyable book. 

Yeah. I recommend these books for those who love fairy tales. Beastly may have haad a darker mood than A Kiss in Time but all the same, they’re awesome. 


Matched by Ally Condie
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins 
The Uglies by Scott Westerfield 

Due to its recent rise in popularity because the movie is in the works, I got curious and tried reading The Hunger Games. I admit, I got bored during the first chapter and so I didn’t go on. But then there was a time when I wanted to escape reality and lose myself in a world that’s entirely not my own… and that’s why I read book. As I got to know the real focus of the story, I thought it was just an action-packed novel. But then I didn’t quite expect stuff like the Opening ceremony, the interview and such where it turns into a pageant instead of a deadly game that deals with life and death. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the first book. I’ve read Catching Fire, too. I’ve been putting off Mockingjay for forever, though. I just lost interest when I was spoiled about the ending and the deaths, etc. 
Matched and The Uglies are some of the books I’ve read this summer. I just noticed that you could easily classify these novels into one genre. Shall I call it Future Fi? 
They all have similar overall formats in their storylines - new civilizations that rise from the ruins of a neglectful human race, a totalitarian government, people finding out the faults of the supposedly “perfect” system, a person who initiates the movement to break free of that system, a love story happening in the midst of it all, not to mention the main protaginists are female that are usually in a love triangle. But it has different main points—The Hunger Games; more on political aspects. Matched—In the life we live today, we should be grateful that we have the freedom to make choices. The Uglies—the concepts of beauty. 
These books make you think. It shows that whatever we do today will also have an effect to the future generations. Although all of us don’t really think of it that much, someday we’re all gonna be part of history. An era of the human race that will be known as “The Generation That Really Screwed up Mother Nature”. 
  • Matched by Ally Condie
  • The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins 
  • The Uglies by Scott Westerfield 

Due to its recent rise in popularity because the movie is in the works, I got curious and tried reading The Hunger Games. I admit, I got bored during the first chapter and so I didn’t go on. But then there was a time when I wanted to escape reality and lose myself in a world that’s entirely not my own… and that’s why I read book. As I got to know the real focus of the story, I thought it was just an action-packed novel. But then I didn’t quite expect stuff like the Opening ceremony, the interview and such where it turns into a pageant instead of a deadly game that deals with life and death. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the first book. I’ve read Catching Fire, too. I’ve been putting off Mockingjay for forever, though. I just lost interest when I was spoiled about the ending and the deaths, etc. 

Matched and The Uglies are some of the books I’ve read this summer. I just noticed that you could easily classify these novels into one genre. Shall I call it Future Fi

They all have similar overall formats in their storylines - new civilizations that rise from the ruins of a neglectful human race, a totalitarian government, people finding out the faults of the supposedly “perfect” system, a person who initiates the movement to break free of that system, a love story happening in the midst of it all, not to mention the main protaginists are female that are usually in a love triangle. But it has different main points—The Hunger Games; more on political aspects. Matched—In the life we live today, we should be grateful that we have the freedom to make choices. The Uglies—the concepts of beauty. 

These books make you think. It shows that whatever we do today will also have an effect to the future generations. Although all of us don’t really think of it that much, someday we’re all gonna be part of history. An era of the human race that will be known as “The Generation That Really Screwed up Mother Nature”. 

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